4 thoughts on “The Readers; Mini Break

  1. Question for Simon and Thomas on The Readers: If your home library was lost (fire, flood, etc) and you were starting over (with or without insurance money), what would you plan to include in this new library? Would you work to replace what you had lost? or would you take this opportunity to start afresh and do things differently?

  2. Simon and Thomas – I am responding to your plea for topics to discuss. How about discussing the most popular literary awards – how they came about, which ones to focus on when searching for a good read, which awards you keep an eye on and great novels you have read after learning they won a literary award. Thank you. Love the podcast.
    Maggie

  3. I’m still making my way through the archives, so apologies if this topic has already been covered, but I would be curious to hear you talk a bit about humour. I work in a public library and despite the demand for funny books, they can be really tricky to locate. In non-fiction the books classified as humour so often fall into a certain definition of “funny” (ie not funny at all – memoirs or joke books by “I used to have a sit-com” types) and the truly funny things are classified by subject or form – possibly without any indication that they’re humorous. For example: although I find David Sedaris can be quite funny, he’s not considered to be a humourist exactly, and not catalogued that way, so unless you know his work you wouldn’t know that his essays are going to make you laugh. With fiction it’s also tough – especially because readers’ ideas of what they find funny are so varied. Often the people asking for a “funny or light read” wouldn’t want the stuff that’s obvious (chick-lit, or slapstick/goofy writers like Christopher Moore) and it can be hard to point to intelligent but also funny writers unless you happen to know their work. Is humour an important part of reading for you guys? If yes, how do you find the good stuff? Thanks – I love the podcast!

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